A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

Brits are bracing for a four-week scorcher with temperatures expected to rise to 95F

Brits face temperatures of 95F (35C) later this month – making Britain hotter than Cancun – as bookmakers lower the odds of July, the hottest month on record.

Mercury is expected to rise above 86F (30C) by the end of this week, before rising further shortly after, as water bosses desperately urge families to change some of their behavior to avoid a hosepipe ban.

People have been told to avoid baths, put less water in the kettle and only do full laundry as hot weather begins to hit Britain’s shores.

The Met Office expects bright and sunny spells tomorrow into the afternoon, particularly in the eastern areas, with temperatures around 24C.

Later in the week, a cloudy and breezy day with some light is expected to follow on Wednesday. There should be fewer clouds on Thursday and Friday, meteorologists predict long periods of warm sunshine.

The elevated temperatures are the result of high pressure build-up in the southern half of the UK, although further north there will likely still be some unsettled conditions which could bring possible showers.

Rebekah Sherwin, Met Office Deputy Chief Meteorologist, said: “The impact of the high pressure is likely to continue in the southern areas into the second week of July and could be more widespread at times.

“Temperatures are expected to be well above average, particularly in the south, with some areas posting highs in the high 20s, locally 30 degrees Celsius, by this weekend.

“Additionally, the forecast is becoming more uncertain and while it may well remain warm, the extent, magnitude and duration of these above-average temperatures are not clear at this time and will only be known as the time approaches.”

However, The Weather Outlook’s Brian Gaze suggests there could be “extreme heat” later in the month, with mercury even rising to 35C.

It comes as bookmakers have lowered the odds of a record-breaking July down to just 6/4 from 4/1 last week.

Ladbrokes’ Alex Apati said: “Sunscreen sales could skyrocket this month if a record-breaking hot July looks good.”

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

People enjoy playing and relaxing on the beach in Bournemouth, Dorset on a warm, sunny Monday afternoon

People enjoy playing and relaxing on the beach in Bournemouth, Dorset on a warm, sunny Monday afternoon

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

Crowds continue to flock to Wimbledon to enjoy the tennis championships in the sun and warm temperatures

Crowds continue to flock to Wimbledon to enjoy the tennis championships in the sun and warm temperatures

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

Tourists pose for a selfie with the Elizabeth Tower and Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London as people enjoy the warm weather

Tourists pose for a selfie with the Elizabeth Tower and Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London as people enjoy the warm weather

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

A colorful crowd enjoys the sunshine and warm weather at the Hampton Court Flower Show this afternoon

Crowds continue to flock to Wimbledon to enjoy the tennis championships in the sun and warm temperatures

Crowds continue to flock to Wimbledon to enjoy the tennis championships in the sun and warm temperatures

Mr Gaze of The Weather Outlook said: “With parts of southern Europe experiencing extreme heat in early summer, there is an opportunity for the UK to import some of that if pressure blocks across Europe and the North Atlantic collapse in the right places.

“Extreme heat waves have become more frequent in the UK in recent years. I wouldn’t be surprised if temperatures climbed to 35C (91F). To put that in perspective, the hottest day of the entire decade of the 1980s was 34.4°C.”

This comes as water utilities have been giving families a host of advice in the coming weeks as part of efforts to avoid a hosepipe ban.

Thames Water suggested Brits “save water by not starting the washing machine until it’s fully loaded”, Anglian Water said people should “use every space in your dishwasher before turning it on”, while Scottish Water told families to “fill the kettle with just that.” Water you need to protect a valuable resource by saving water.’

State water regulator Ofwat said: “If possible, shower instead of bathing. A five-minute shower uses half the volume of a bath. Wait until you have a full load before using your washing machine or dishwasher.’

The latest fears of a hose line ban came in May 2020. It was the driest May in 124 years, after just 1.25 inches (31.8 mm) of rain fell in the month following an unusually dry and sunny April.

Yorkshire Water then warned customers not to spray their lawn and take a four-minute shower instead of a bath after noticing a surge in demand amid the UK’s first Covid-19 lockdown.

The company urged its three million homes to voluntarily reduce their water use and urged people to turn off the taps when brushing their teeth.

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